2014 Vietnam Update

 

For more information on the 2014 Vietnam Update, contact:

Dr Philip Taylor
Department of Anthropology
ANU College of Asia & the Pacific
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT, 0200
Ph. +61 2 61252300
Email: philip.taylor@anu.edu.au

Convenor:

Philip Taylor

Administrative support:

Mrs Kerrie Hogan

Participating ANU departments:

Department of Anthropology, School of Culture, History & Language; Department of Political & Social Change, School of International Political & Strategic Studies.

Sponsored by:

DFAT

and

The ANU College of Asia and Pacific

 

2014 Vietnam Update Abstracts

 

2014 Vietnam Update images on flickr

 

 

Connected and Disconnected in Viet Nam

Connections are the source of life in Vietnam. The ties that bind Vietnamese people to their community, nation and wider world are central to wealth, identity, security and wellbeing. The 2014 Vietnam Update explores the significance of connection–and disconnection– in contemporary Vietnamese life. Sixteen scholars will present papers that examine how connections matter in politics, development, the economy and social affairs, and shape regional, ethnic, religious, gendered and sub-cultural identities. Presenters will investigate forms of disconnection associated with disadvantage and vulnerability alongside those deemed beneficial, and will shed light on connections that are transgressive or controversial. The two-day Update will commence with presentations on important recent developments in Vietnam’s political and economic affairs.

This Vietnam Update is the twentieth to be held at the Australian National University. ANU Chancellor Professor Gareth Evans will help to mark this important milestone in the Vietnam Update series by delivering the opening address.

The Vietnam Update will take place on 1-2 December in the Sir Roland Wilson Building on the ANU campus. For more information on the conference program and logistics please see the relevant links, contacts and attachments on this page.

 

Please register your attendance to the 2014 Vietnam Update here:

Eventbrite - 2014 Vietnam Update: Connected and Disconnected in Viet Nam

 

Connections are the source of life in Vietnam. The tangible and intangible ties that bind people to their families, nation and wider world are characteristically rich. They are constitutive of personhood and have a bearing on wealth, security and wellbeing. It is therefore timely to examine the significance of connection–and disconnection– in Vietnamese life. We have yet to understand the importance of such processes for politics, the economy and contemporary social movements and identities. How does being connected or disconnected matter in the fields of development and technology and in the shaping of ethnic, religious and sub-cultural identities? 

The 2014 Vietnam Update is dedicated to exploring these themes. Conference speakers have been invited to engage with the following sets of questions: 

1. How significant in the conduct of business, governance, politics and cultural life are social ties such as lineages; place-based, religious and ethnic networks; or educational and army connections? How are such connections acted on, contested or resisted? Are new modes of social relatedness emerging and are old connections being revived? Who decides which connections are acceptable and are the criteria stable? Under what conditions do virtuous connections become transformed into disreputable ones, such as ‘special interests’, corruption, backwardness, or subversion?

 2. Connectivity is a touchstone of national and international development programs. Vietnam’s transport and communications infrastructure has been dramatically upgraded over the past two decades, with the aim of improving the country’s socio-economic standing. What effects have such developments had on the flow of people, goods and ideas, on economic growth, and on social structure? Has improved connectivity overcome or augmented social disparities, or created new marginalised and vulnerable groups? Have certain areas, groups or sectors missed out on this veritable revolution in connections? 

3. Vietnam’s dynamic regional and urban centres have long been highly connected. How have such linkages shaped local identity, creativity, or autonomy? At the same time, certain regions, peoples, socio-cultural projects and affiliations are said to be isolated, or disconnected, making them potentially disadvantaged and vulnerable, or indeed threatening to modernity or the nation’s self-image. Are all connections equally visible and valued? In what contexts is relatedness disavowed or disconnection pursued as a worthy objective?  

 4. Technology and mobility have permitted the circulation of ideas, styles and practices that challenge existing hierarchies and identities. An emphasis on the governance of connectedness in Vietnam has seen controls placed on Internet usage, on associational life, and on linkages citizens have with overseas organisations. Contributions are sought that document the origins and nature of transgressive associations and ideologies of relatedness or reflect on the benefits or costs of disengagement and disconnection. 

 5. Connection is a subjective quality. Appropriate methodologies are required to tease out how relationships to others and to wider totalities such as society, the state, or the world, are embodied, imagined and expressed. Papers are invited that use rich description to reflect on processes of subjectification, on ontologies of relatedness and disconnection, and on practices by which relatedness in Vietnam is enacted, resisted and re-created.

 

Update Publications

Land Conflicts in Vietnam, John Gillespie and Philip Taylor (eds.), 2014. Special Issue of the Journal of Vietnamese Studies, Vol. 9, No. 3.

Risk, Opportunity and Resilience: Contemporary Vietnamese Mobilities, Ashley Carruthers (ed.), 2012. Special Issue of the Journal of Vietnamese Studies, Vol. 7, No. 4.

Minorities at Large: New Approaches to Minority Ethnicity in Vietnam, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Labour in Vietnam, Anita Chan (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Education in Vietnam, Jonathan London (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Modernity and Re-enchantment: Religion in Post-revolutionary Vietnam, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2007. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies; 2008. Maryland: Lexington Books.

Beyond Hanoi: Local Government in Vietnam, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet and David G. Marr (eds), 2004. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Social Inequality in Vietnam and the Challenges to Reform, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2004. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Getting Organized in Vietnam: Moving in and around the Socialist State, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet, Russell H.K. Heng, and David W.H. Koh (eds), 2003. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Consuming Urban Culture in Contemporary Vietnam, Lisa Drummond and Mandy Thomas (eds), 2003. London: Routledge/Curzon.

The Mass Media in Vietnam, David Marr (ed.), 1998. Monograph 25. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University, 1998.

Doi Moi: Ten Years after the 1986 Party Congress, Adam Fforde (ed.), 1997. Monograph 23. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Vietnam Assessment: Creating a Sound Investment Climate, Suiwah Leung (ed.), 1996. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Dilemmas of Development: Vietnam Update 1994, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet (ed.), 1995. Monograph 22. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Vietnam’s Rural Transformation, Doug J. Porter and Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet (eds), 1995. Boulder: Westview Press, and Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Vietnam and The Rule of Law, Carlyle Thayer and David G. Marr (eds), 1993. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Doi Moi: Vietnam’s Renovation Policy and Performance, Dean K. Forbes, Terence H. Hull. David G. Marr and Brian Brogan (eds), 1991. Monograph 14. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Program

Venue: Sir Ronald Wilson Building, Room 1.02, McCoy Circuit, ANU

Day one - Monday 1 December

8.00-8.30am           Registration and tea/Coffee

8.30-9.00am           Welcome and Opening Address 

                              Professor the Hon Gareth Evans AC QC FASSA

                              Chancellor, Australian National University

9.00-10.30am         Session One

Political Review, 2014

Carlyle Thayer, University of New South Wales

The Vietnamese Economy: Performance and Prospects for Long-term Development

Suiwah Leung, Australian National University

10.30-11.00am       Morning tea break

11.00 -12.30pm      Session Two

Vietnam’s ‘Hot Peace’ in its East Sea

Do Thanh Hai,  Australian National University

Everyday Staging of Vietnamese Citizenship in the South China Sea through Fishing Practices and Patriotic Tourism

Edyta Roszko, Durham University

12.30-1.30pm         Lunch break

1.30-3.00pm           Session Three

Social Relations, Economic Inequality, and Regional Variation in Contemporary Vietnam: A View from Two Vietnamese Villages

Hy Van Luong, University of Toronto

Personal Wealth, National Pride: Vietnamese Television and Commercial Nationalism

Giang Nguyen-Thu, University of Queensland

3.00-3.30pm           Afternoon tea break

3.30-5.00pm           Session Four

Bodhisattva Femininity: Supernatural Exchanges and Worldly Connections in Vietnamese Buddhists’ Charitable Practice

Le Hoang Anh Thu, Australian National University

Women as Fish: Rural Migration, Morality, and Social Mobility in Vietnam

Linh Khanh Nguyen, Syracuse University

7.00pm                   CONFERENCE DINNER - Lemon Grass Thai Restaurant


Day Two - Tuesday 2 December

8.15am                   Tea and coffee

8.30-10.00am         Session Five

The Munificent State and the Struggle to be Poor in Vietnam’s Borderlands

Peter Chaudhry, Australian National University

‘Red Seeds’ of the Central Highlands: Social Relatedness and Political Integration of Selected Ethnic Minority Groups in Post-war Vietnam

Nguyen Thu Huong, Vietnam National University, Hanoi

10.00-10.30am        Morning tea break

10.30-12.00pm       Session Six

Minority Cadres in the Socialist State: A Case Study of Thais in Northwest Vietnam

Ha Viet Quan, Vietnam Committee for Ethnic minority Affairs and ANU

The Quest for a Khmer Education in Post-socialist Vietnam

Philip Taylor, Australian National University

12.00-1.00pm         Lunch break

1.00-2.30pm            Session Seven

Cassava Connections: How New Commodity Networks are Transforming Vietnam’s Upland Societies and Landscapes

Phuc Xuan To and Sango Mahanty,  Australian National University

‘Here, Everyone is Like Everyone Else!’ Exile and Re-emplacement in an Exclusive Leprosy Village

Le Hoang Ngoc Yen, Australian National University

2.30-3.00pm            Afternoon tea break

3.00-4.30pm            Session Eight

Remapping the Worship of Hung Kings in Phu Tho, Vietnam

Thi Diem Hang Ngo, University of Adelaide

Described, Inscribed, Written Off: Heritagization as (dis)connection

Oscar Salemink, University of Copenhagen

4.30-5.00pm            Plenary Discussion

 5.00pm                     Conference concludes

 


2014 Vietnam Update Abstracts

 

Please register your attendance to the 2014 Vietnam Update here:

Eventbrite - 2014 Vietnam Update: Connected and Disconnected in Viet Nam

 

 

For more information on the 2014 Vietnam Update, contact the convenor:

Dr Philip Taylor
Department of Anthropology
ANU College of Asia & the Pacific
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT, 0200
T  +61 2 61252300
E philip.taylor@anu.edu.au


For all administrative enquires contact:

Mrs Kerrie Hogan
Senior Outreach and Communication Officer
School of International Political & Strategic Studies
ANU College of Asia & the Pacific
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT, 0200
T  +61 2 6125 2167
E ips@anu.edu.au

Please register your attendance to the 2014 Vietnam Update here:

Eventbrite - 2014 Vietnam Update: Connected and Disconnected in Viet Nam

 

Updated:  1 February, 2015/Responsible Officer:  Web Communications Coordinator/Page Contact:  Web Communications Coordinator